Tag Archives: hhs

HHS Just Announced Beacon Awards of $220 million

Surprised not to see Massachusetts on the list, but exciting nonetheless… Here they are:

Community Services Council of Tulsa, Tulsa, Okla. – $12,043,948

Leverage broad community partnerships with hospitals, providers, payers, and government agencies  to expand a community-wide care coordination system, which will increase appropriate referrals for cancer screenings, decrease unnecessary specialist visits and (with telemedicine) increase access to care for patients with diabetes.

Delta Health Alliance, Inc., Stoneville, Miss. – $14,666,156

Focus on achieving improvements for diabetic patients by electronically linking isolated systems and practices for care management, medication therapy management and patient education.

Eastern Maine Healthcare Systems, Brewer Maine – $12,749,740.

Expand community connectivity, including long-term care, primary care and specialist providers, to existing Health Information Exchange and promote the use of telemedicine and patient self-management in order to improve care for elderly patients and individuals needing long-term or home care.

Geisinger Clinic, Danville, Pa. – $16,069,110

Enhance care for patients with pulmonary disease and congestive heart failure by creating a community-wide medical home, promoting Health Information Exchange and extending Geisinger’s proven model for practice redesign  to independent healthcare organizations throughout region.

HealthInsight, Salt Lake City, Utah – $15,790,181

Improve Diabetes management performance measures by increasing availability, accuracy and transparency of quality reporting, leverage Intermountain Healthcare’s strategies to reduce health systems costs throughout the region, and improve public health reporting.

Indiana Health Information Exchange, INC., Indianapolis, Ind. – $16,008,431

Expand the country’s largest Health Information Exchange to new community providers in order to improve cholesterol and blood sugar control for diabetic patients and reduce preventable re-admissions through telemonitoring of high risk chronic disease patients after hospital discharge.

Inland Northwest Health Services, Spokane, Wash. – $15,702,479

Focus on increasing preventive services for diabetic patients in rural areas by extending Health Information Exchange and establishing anchor institutions in close proximity to remote clinics that will promulgate successes in health IT supported care coordination.

Louisiana Public Health Institute, New Orleans, La. – $13,525,434

Reduce racial health disparities and improve control of diabetes and smoking cessation rates by linking technically isolated health systems, providers, and hospitals; and empower patients by increasing their access to Personal Health Records.

Mayo Clinic Rochester, d/b/a Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minn. – $12,284,770

Enhance patient management and, reduce costs associated with hospitalization and emergency services for patients with diabetes and childhood asthma and address reduce health disparities for underserved populations and rural communities.

Rocky Mountain Health Maintenance Organization, Grand Junction, Colo. – $11, 878, 279

Enable robust collection of clinical data from health systems, providers, and hospitals in order to inform practice redesign to improve blood pressure control in patients with diabetes and hypertension, increase smoking cessation counseling, and reduce unnecessary emergency department utilization and hospital re-admissions.

Southern Piedmont Community Care Plan, Inc., Concord, N.C. – $15,907,622

Improve care coordination for patients with diabetes, heart disease, hypertension, and asthma by engaging patients and providers in bidirectional data sharing through a Health Record Bank, empowering patients and family members to participate in self-management through patient portals, and expanding access to care managers to facilitate post-discharge planning.

The Regents of the University of California, San Diego, San Diego, Calif. – $15,275,115

Expand pre-hospital emergency field care and electronic information transmission to improve outcomes for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease, empower patients to engage in their own health management through web portal and cellular telephone technology, and improve continuity of care for veterans and military personnel through the Veterans Affairs/Department of Defense Virtual Lifetime Electronic Record initiative.

University of Hawaii at Hilo, Hilo, Hawaii – $16,091, 390

Implement a region-wide Health Information Exchange and Patient Health Record solution and utilize secure, internet-based care coordination and tele-monitoring tools to increase access to specialty care for patients with chronic diseases such as diabetes, hypertension, and obesity in this rural, health-professional shortage area .

Western New York Clinical Information Exchange, Inc., Buffalo, N.Y. – $16,092,485

Utilize clinical decision support tools such as registries and point-of-care alerts and reminders and innovative telemedicine solutions to improve primary and specialty care for diabetic patients, decrease preventable emergency room visits, hospitalizations and re-admissions for patients with diabetes and congestive heart failure or pneumonia, and improve immunization rates among diabetic patients.

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HIT/Privacy Timeline from Stimulus Bill

From Dr. John Halamka, CIO of CareGroup Health System in Boston, MA (original post here: The Timeline for ARRA Privacy Provisions), a bookmarked PDF-version of the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act that highlights sections relevant to HIT & privacy: http://ecommons.med.harvard.edu/ec_res/nt/A3B4A28D-987B-4271-B003-5A877B4F4E38/arrabookmarks.pdf

The rough timeline is below:

Upon enactment (February 16, 2009)

  • Application of new tiered civil penalties based on the nature of HIPAA violations, up to $50,000 per violation and an annual maximum of $1.5 million (Section 13410)
  • Enforcement by State Attorney Generals for offenses occurring post enactment (Section 13410e)

Within 45 days of enactment (April 3, 2009)

  • Appointment of HIT Policy Committee members (Section 3002b)

Within 60 days of enactment (April 18, 2009)

  • HHS Secretary will issue guidance on methodologies and technologies that render information unreadable (Section 13402)

Within 180 ays of enactment (August 16, 2009)

  • HHS and the Federal Trade Commission will promulgate interim final regulations on notification of breaches. The FTC rules will apply to breach notification by PHRs that are not covered by HIPAA or Business Associate agreements (Section 13402, 13407)

By December 31, 2009

  • HHS must adopt through rulemaking the initial prioritized set of standards which should include the accounting for disclosures (Section 3002b)

Due within one year post enactment (February 17, 2010)

  • The Secretary will appoint a Chief Privacy Officer (Section 3001)
  • The Office of Civil Rights and HHS will launch an education initiative to improve public transparency on the use of health information (Section 13403)
  • The Government Accountability Office will report on best practices for disclosures for treatment and use of electronic informed consent (Section 13424)
  • HHS will report on and provide guidance on de-identification (section 13424c)
  • Covered entities must enter into Business Associate Agreements with PHRs, HIEs, and other services that handle projected health information (Section 13405e)
  • HHS will issue rules on opting out of fundraising solicitations (Section 13406)
  • HHS will report on guidance on the effective technical safeguards for carrying out the HIPAA security rule (Section 13401c)
  • HHS and the Federal Trade Commission will report on privacy and security requirements for PHR vendors and applications

One year post enactment (February 17, 2010)

  • HHS and the Office of Civil Rights clarify application of criminal penalties for non-covered entities (Section 13409)
  • HHS to issue rules on which entities are required to be business associates (Section 13401)
  • Right to restrict disclosures to health plans for services paid for out of pocket (Section 13405a)
  • HHS Secretary required to conduct periodic audits of entities covered by HIPAA (Section 13411)
  • Right of electronic access of records by patients takes effect (Section 13405e)

Within 18 months of enactment (August 17, 2010)

  • HHS guidance on minimum necessary data (Section 13405c)
  • Regulations regarding sale of data prohibition which take effect 6 months post promulgation (Section 13405a)

By 2011

  • Initial deadline for complying with new accounting and disclosure rules for information kept in EHRs acquired after January 1, 2009 (Section 13405c)

24 months post enactment (February 17, 2011)

  • Clarification of ability to pursue civil penalties when criminal penalties are not pursued (Section 13405)

By 2012

  • Regulations for methodology for distributing penalties or settlement money to harmed individuals (Section 13410)

By 2013

  • Extended deadline for complying with new accounting and disclosure rules for information kept in EHRs acquired after January 1, 2009 (Section 13405c)

By 2014

  • GAO will report on the impact of ARRA (Section 13424)
  • Initial deadline for complying with new accounting and disclosure rules for information kept in EHRs acquired before January 1, 2009 (Section 13405c)

By 2016

  • Extended deadline for complying with new accounting and disclosure rules for information kept in EHRs acquired before January 1, 2009 (Section 13405c)

Congress approves $19 billion for health IT

Excerpt by Andrew Noyes, Congress Daily from NextGov.com

Deal Leaves Money, Language On Health IT Mostly Intact

The compromise stimulus deal leaves much of each chamber’s proposed funding for health information technology intact, according to an overview circulated by House Speaker Pelosi Wednesday and a preliminary summary of the compromise that was subject to change. The final package provides $19 billion to encourage nationwide adoption of electronic medical records, with $17 billion for Medicare and Medicaid incentives for federally qualified health centers, rural health clinics, children’s hospitals, and others. The Senate version, which won approval Tuesday after members stripped out $100 billion, included $16 billion for Medicare and Medicaid incentives, about $2 billion less than the House plan that passed last month. The Senate also imposed a $1.5 billion cap on incentive payments to “critical access hospitals,” while the House included no such language. Conferees reportedly accounted for those facilities, but it is unclear whether the cap remained.

The negotiated stimulus would provide temporary bonuses of as much as $64,000 for physicians and up to $11 million for hospitals that adopt e-health records, the summary document stated. Medicare penalties for noncompliance would also be phased in starting in 2014. The package would also codify the HHS Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT and establish a transparent process for developing standards for e-health records by 2010. An immediate $2 billion would be available to HHS for health IT infrastructure, training, telemedicine, and other grants. The Senate had previously asked for $3 billion, while the House wanted just over $2 billion.

The package would also expand federal privacy and security protections for health IT, such as requiring that an individual be notified if there is an unauthorized disclosure or use of their health information and requiring a patient’s permission to use their personal records for marketing purposes. Details had not emerged by presstime about whether complaints by the privacy community had been addressed. Some watchdogs pressed conferees to take specific steps to close what they argued were marketing loopholes left open in the House and Senate versions as well as make changes to breach notification language. Several sources said they believed a House provision mandating healthcare operations rules from HHS had been dropped entirely. Providers complained the regulations could have required either prior patient consent or the use of de-identified data before information could be exchanged.